Depressive Symptoms and Addictive Behaviors in Young Adults After Childhood Trauma: The Mediating Role of Personality Organization and Despair

Background:There is substantial evidence that traumatic experiences in childhood increase the likelihood of mood pathology and addictive behaviors in adolescence and young adulthood. Furthermore, both forms of psychopathology have been linked to deficiencies in personality organization and a common primary emotion core. In this study, we intended to further investigate these interactions by assuming a mediating role of personality organization and despair regarding the relationship between childhood trauma and psychiatric symptom burden later in life.

Facets of Spirituality Diminish the Positive Relationship between Insecure Attachment and Mood Pathology in Young Adults

Traditionally, in attachment theory, secure attachment has been linked to parameters of mental health, while insecure attachment has been associated with parameters of psychopathology. Furthermore, spirituality and attachment to God have been discussed as corresponding to, or compensating for, primary attachment experiences. Accordingly, they may contribute to mental health or to mental illness.

Structure and centrality of religiosity/spirituality among psychiatric in-patients

Objectives: The main purpose of this study was to investigate the linkage between differences in religious/spiritual well-being to personality and mental illness in psychiatric patients and healthy controls.
Methods: Addiction patients (N=120), depressive patients (N=100) and healthy controls (N=200) were given a multidimensional questionnaire for religious/spiritual well-being in combination with well established measures for personality/psychiatric diagnostics. Data were evaluated using descriptive methods, regression analysis and GLM multivariate.

“Spiritus contra Spiritum?”: Spiritual Well-Being and Depression Among Male Alcohol Dependents in Treatment

There is an ongoing discussion concerning the role of spirituality in alcoholism treatment. The main purpose of this study was to find out more about the spiritual needs among alcohol dependents.Spiritual well-being (SWB) and religious coping (RC) in the context of suicidal/depressive symptoms were investigated twice in 81 wellcharacterized male alcoholic inpatients, pre- and postwithdrawal treatment. Although suicidal/depressive symptoms decreased substantially as a result of the intervention, no changes were found with respect to SWB and RC.

Soul Darkness? Dimensions of Religious/ Spiritual Well-Being among Mood-Disordered Inpatients Compared to Healthy Controls

Background: Religiosity and spirituality have been found to be substantially associated with a variety of mental health and illness parameters. However, relevant empirical evidence is sparse, and more research is needed in order to further understand what role religiosity/spirituality plays in the development, progression and healing process of a psychiatric disease. Thus, the purpose of this study was to find out more information about the religious/spiritual needs of anxious/depressive inpatients.